Science on Tap: Molecular Shape-shifters – Understanding information flow in cells and viral invasion

FREE EVENT! Get there early to get a seat!

TuesdayNovember 266:30 PM

Program Notes

Please plan to arrive no later than 6:00pm if you plan on ordering drinks or food.  The talk will begin promptly at 6:30pm. 

Event Details

BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES AND SCIENCES PROGRAM AT SKIDMORE COLLEGE, SUSTAINABLE SARATOGA, AND SPAC

Science on Tap is a monthly opportunity for conversation, debate and interaction among scientists and the public while enjoying a fresh pint (available for purchase) at a local pub or brewery.

On  Nov 26th, please join Dr. Lia Ball, Assistant Professor of Chemistry at Skidmore College, as she explains how intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) interact with folded proteins in the context of disease, or as part of normal cellular function.

Our genes code for protein molecules, tiny machines that complete all types of cellular processes, but how do these proteins that are too small to be seen under a microscope actually function? Dr. Ball uses state-of-the-art computer simulations to get a detailed picture of how these proteins pass messages in our cells and even how viral proteins can hijack cellular functions. While scientists normally think of proteins as having only one structure, some of these proteins are much more flexible and can change shape to complete their function. Computer simulations allow us study this shape-shifting ability and better understand the tiny machines inside our cells.

As always, Science on Tap is free and open to the public. 21 and under are welcome, and seating is first come first serve.

Click here for Science on Tap Saratoga’s fall speaker lineup: https://sustainablesaratoga.org/science-on-tap/

About the Speaker

Dr. Ball uses computer simulations and other computational methods to study how intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) interact with folded proteins in the context of disease, or as part of normal cellular function. IDPs are different from typical folded proteins in that they lack a single well-defined structure and instead dynamically occupy many alternate structures. Dr. Ball’s interdisciplinary research draws on knowledge from physics, chemistry, biology, and computer science to understand the interactions between disordered and folded proteins and how these interactions are important for their function. One current research project focused on how an IDP that is part of the HIV virus interacts with folded human proteins to change their structure, dynamics, and function.

More information about Dr. Ball

Location

The Parting Glass
40 Lake Ave, Saratoga Springs, NY 12866

Group Sales